RW TEX-LAW Feeds

Great collection of legal web feeds and RSS articles. All links go directly to the articles and publisher information is posted. RW TEX-LAW Attorneys at law - Your Cypress, Houston, Texas Lawyers

Do conflicts in other nations affect your custody order?

When parents divorce, one of the hot-button topics in their split is often centered around custody. This issue can get particularly complicated when one parent has business or family ties in another country.

What happens if your spouse takes your child to another country (legally or not) and refuses to come back, despite the existing custody order you have in place? Here’s what you need to know:

Determining which country has jurisdiction may not be easy

Generally speaking, a custody order from the child’s home state will control what happens in any court inside the United States – but the harsh reality of your situation is different. Foreign courts are under no obligation to follow U.S. laws, nor do they necessarily have to respect a U.S. custody order if they’re disinclined to do so.

This can get incredibly difficult to parse if one parent actually resides in the foreign country in question and the other parent is U.S.-based. The foreign-based parent may not believe that it’s fair for the U.S. court to hold sway over the situation if the court in their own country is more favorable to their case and willing to accept jurisdiction.

The Hague Convention may offer some recourse over parental abductions

Sometimes, parents refuse to even try to work things out legally. They’re willing to engage in parental abduction and simply flee the country to maintain full custody of their child or children.

In situations where a parent has absconded with the child to a foreign country illegally (without the court’s permission or even against the rules of the existing custody order), the Hague Convention may be helpful.

If the country your children are in is a signatory to the Hague Convention, you can invoke this treaty to ask for a hearing. If the child was wrongfully removed from their country of habitual residence (the United States), the treaty requires the child to be returned.

Unfortunately, the definition of what makes for “habitual residence” isn’t always clear, and the longer a child stays in a foreign land the more likely that country could decide that it should retain jurisdiction of the case. That means you need to act quickly to resolve an international custody dispute.

(Originally posted by On Behalf Of Laura Dale And Associates and P.C.)
Continue reading
  70 Hits

The Hidden Truth on Career Law Firm Revealed

The web site should be based on informative content. The lawyer’s web site design should be very best and geared toward attracting potential purchasers. The design ought to reflect the qualities like professionalism, reliability and the lawyer’s urge to assist its shoppers. If the shopper is pressured to contact the lawyer instantly after visiting the […]

The post The Hidden Truth on Career Law Firm Revealed first appeared on Family in Law.

(Originally posted by Teel)
Continue reading
  46 Hits

Tesla Shareholders: San Francisco Jurors Will Give Elon Musk Fair Shake

Tesla shareholders on Wednesday opposed a request to transfer a Jan. 17 trial to Texas due to negative media attention in San Francisco about CEO Elon Musk.

     
Continue reading
  40 Hits

State Bar of Texas offers free CLE webcast on succession planning essentials

Laura Gibson

Editor’s Note: State Bar of Texas President Laura Gibson sent the following message to members on January 11.

I recently joined Gray Reed senior counsel Greg Sampson for a TexasBarCLE webcast on succession planning essentials titled “Don’t Wait, Designate.” The video is now available to all State Bar of Texas members to watch on demand, free of charge, on the TexasBarCLE website (under “Free Online Classes”) for 1 hour of MCLE ethics credit.

WATCH HERE

(Note: When you click the links above, you will be prompted to login to TexasBarCLE.com, unless you are already logged in.)

This informative webcast covers topics including:

Essential file management and distribution policies for any transition Planning for a targeted transition and exit (including rules governing the sale of a practice) Planning for a sudden or unexpected cessation of practice under Rule 13.02 and new Rule 13.04 of the Texas Rules of Disciplinary Procedure

Why is this topic important now? In short, we have an aging lawyer population, but not all of us have taken the necessary steps to plan for the eventual transition or closure of our practices. Don’t let a lack of planning impact the legacy you leave for your families and clients. Please take time to watch this CLE presentation and evaluate your contingency plans.

I also encourage you to go to texasbar.com/succession, where you can quickly designate a custodian attorney, and to texasbarpractice.com, where you can find a wealth of law practice management resources from the State Bar, including information on closing a practice.

“Don’t Wait, Designate” is the third free CLE webcast related to my initiatives as State Bar president. You can find the prior webcasts on suicide and depression prevention and understanding the attorney grievance system on the TexasBarCLE website by clicking here and looking under “Free Online Classes.”

(Originally posted by Guest Blogger)
Continue reading
  36 Hits

State Bar of Texas offers free CLE webcast on succession planning essentials

Laura Gibson

Editor’s Note: State Bar of Texas President Laura Gibson sent the following message to members on January 11.

I recently joined Gray Reed senior counsel Greg Sampson for a TexasBarCLE webcast on succession planning essentials titled “Don’t Wait, Designate.” The video is now available to all State Bar of Texas members to watch on demand, free of charge, on the TexasBarCLE website (under “Free Online Classes”) for 1 hour of MCLE ethics credit.

WATCH HERE

(Note: When you click the links above, you will be prompted to login to TexasBarCLE.com, unless you are already logged in.)

This informative webcast covers topics including:

Essential file management and distribution policies for any transition Planning for a targeted transition and exit (including rules governing the sale of a practice) Planning for a sudden or unexpected cessation of practice under Rule 13.02 and new Rule 13.04 of the Texas Rules of Disciplinary Procedure

Why is this topic important now? In short, we have an aging lawyer population, but not all of us have taken the necessary steps to plan for the eventual transition or closure of our practices. Don’t let a lack of planning impact the legacy you leave for your families and clients. Please take time to watch this CLE presentation and evaluate your contingency plans.

I also encourage you to go to texasbar.com/succession, where you can quickly designate a custodian attorney, and to texasbarpractice.com, where you can find a wealth of law practice management resources from the State Bar, including information on closing a practice.

“Don’t Wait, Designate” is the third free CLE webcast related to my initiatives as State Bar president. You can find the prior webcasts on suicide and depression prevention and understanding the attorney grievance system on the TexasBarCLE website by clicking here and looking under “Free Online Classes.”

(Originally posted by Guest Blogger)
Continue reading
  29 Hits

'Karma's a Bitch': Law Firm Partner's Text to Female Attorney Goes Viral, Costs Him His Job

"What you did—collecting salary from the firm while sitting on your ass, except to find time to interview for another job—says everything one needs to know about your character," the text read, in part.

     
Continue reading
  39 Hits

Covington Sued for Non-Compliance With Investigation Into Hack That Compromised Client Info

The firm's counsel at Gibson Dunn claims attorney client-privilege shields it from having to give the SEC details about close to 300 public company clients whose information has reportedly been compromised.

     
Continue reading
  38 Hits

Former Apple CPO Jane Horvath: Big Tech Isn't Trying to Get Ahead of the Law

On the heels of joining Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher this week, Apple's former Chief Privacy Officer, Jane Horvath discusses the key privacy issues she will be watching in 2023, and how Big Tech's policies intersect with federal regulation.

     
Continue reading
  29 Hits

In Recession Planning, Firms See 'Opportunities' and 'Challenges'

Bet-the-company transactions are down, but litigation, restructuring and smaller deals offer a way forward.

     
Continue reading
  30 Hits

FTX Creditor Names Remain Redacted as Recovered Funds Reach $5B

Delaware Bankruptcy Judge John T. Dorsey decided to continue allowing FTX to redact creditors' names from filings for three more months. The three-month window is half of what the debtors requested.

     
Continue reading
  22 Hits

SCOTUS Keeps New York's Concealed Carry Restrictions in Place for Now

The law made it a felony to possess a gun in "sensitive" locations

     
Continue reading
  43 Hits

ALSP Elevate Suffered a Data Breach in March 2022

"We became aware that certain computer systems in our environment were inaccessible as a result of malicious file encryption," Elevate said in a notice signed by Steve Harmon, the company's chief operating officer and general counsel.

     
Continue reading
  59 Hits

Judges Raise Sixth Amendment Questions in Appeal of Attorney's Drug-Related Conspiracy Conviction

The Richmond-based appeals panel made both parties struggle with questions about jury instructions and how denying them could have swayed the case's outcome.

     
Continue reading
  24 Hits

New Incentives for Going Green in 2023

The Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) of 2022 goes beyond tackling the recent challenges of the U.S. economy, like health care costs or the tax code, and includes laws aimed at increasing affordable access to clean energy. The purpose of these news laws is to significantly reduce U.S. greenhouse gas pollution levels by 2030. Starting this year, American homeowners and renters can benefit from tax credits and upfront discounts designed to increase access to clean technology.

Discounts are available for the purchase and installation of appliances, with the discount coming directly from the manufacturer or contractor. Items qualifying for savings include electric stoves, electric panels, and appliances that utilize heat pump technology.

Tax credits are available toward the purchase and installation of specific items approved for the electrification of your household. Items or projects qualifying for credit include new & used electric vehicles, heat pump powered home systems, and the weatherization of your home.

Some discounts and credits are available now. The rest are projected to be available later this year and will be available over the next 10 years. Use the IRA Savings Calculator to estimate the household electrification incentives you may qualify for.

Government Resources

Rosenberg, Joel. Electrify Everything in Your Home: A Guide to Comfy, Healthy, Carbon-Free Living. 1st ed., 2021.

Wyent, Cora, et al. Electrify My Government: How a federal government-wide electrification campaign will meet our emissions goals. 2022.

Your guide to the Inflation Reduction Act: Everything you need to know to maximize your savings.

(Originally posted by Elizabeth Martinez)
Continue reading
  61 Hits

Texas Healthcare Fraud Crackdown

Two federal cases this year demonstrate the measures authorities are taking to fight recent healthcare fraud in Texas. months in prison In one case, a Texas couple that owned and operated several group homes was sentenced to 60for engaging in a $1 million Medicare fraud scheme to send residents to a community health center in exchange for illegal kickbacks concealed as payment for undelivered or unnecessary services. In the second case, a Texas doctor pleaded guilty to authorizing illegitimate or unnecessary prescriptions for medical equipment and cancer genetic testing to patients in exchange for more than $466,000 in Medicare kickbacks.

These cases are typical examples of healthcare fraud that are prosecuted every week in Dallas. Healthcare fraud often involves sophisticated systems that may involve millions of dollars of alleged fraud and professionals like doctors and business owners. The criminal defense firm of Broden & Mickelson, LLP provides dedicated legal assistance to individuals facing serious allegations of healthcare fraud. If you are facing serious healthcare fraud charges, contact us today for a free consultation with an experienced Texas healthcare fraud attorney.

What Is Healthcare Fraud?

The Texas Attorney General defines healthcare fraud as “a deliberate deception or misrepresentation of services that results in an unauthorized reimbursement.” Healthcare fraud can be complex, multi-million-dollar schemes involving multiple parties. People may commit healthcare fraud against federal healthcare benefits programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, state or local healthcare agencies, hospital systems, or patients.

Types of Healthcare Fraud Charges

Healthcare fraud takes many forms and covers many related crimes, including the following:

Conspiracy to commit healthcare fraud Insurance fraud Bribery Kickbacks Prescription drug fraud and abuse Fraudulent use or possession of identifying information

Possible Penalties for Healthcare Fraud

The penalties for healthcare fraud depend on factors such as the breadth of the scheme (i.e., interstate or within the state), the amount of money involved, and whether the fraud breaks other federal or state laws.

If the defendant has violated a Texas state law, they could face the following penalties:

Class C misdemeanor (fraud valued at less than $100) – A fine of up to $500 Class B misdemeanor (fraud valued between $100 to $749) – A fine of up to $2,000, jail time for 180 days or less, or both Class A misdemeanor (fraud valued between $750 to $2,499) – A fine of up to $4,000, jail time for one year or less, or both State jail felony (fraud valued between $2,500 to $29,999) – A prison term of 180 days to 2 years and a fine of up to $10,000 Third-degree felony (fraud valued between $30,000 to $149,999 or 25-49 fraudulent claims) – A prison term of two to 10 years and a fine of up to $10,000 Second-degree felony (fraud valued between $150,000 to $299,999 or 50 or more fraudulent claims) – A prison term of two to 20 years and a fine of up to $10,000 First-degree felony (fraud valued at $300,000 or more) – A prison term of five to 99 years and a fine up to $10,000

If a defendant is charged with a federal crime, they could face time in federal prison and thousands of dollars in fines per false or fraudulent claim.

How a Healthcare Fraud Defense Attorney Can Help

If you are facing charges for healthcare fraud, you need a Dallas healthcare fraud lawyer who can vigorously defend your rights. Your freedom, future, and finances are at stake. The healthcare fraud defense attorneys at Broden & Michelsen, LLP are ready to protect your rights and fight for the best outcome possible. Contact our office today for a free, confidential consultation.

The post Texas Healthcare Fraud Crackdown appeared first on Broden, Mickelsen LLP.

(Originally posted by Broden Mickelsen)
Continue reading
  34 Hits

Maquiladora Program

In 1964, the Mexican government introduced Maquiladoras as a strategy to attract foreign investment and increase industrialization on the Mexican border. Maquiladora’s process, produce, transform, or repair goods owned by non-Mexican residents (foreign residents). Currently, foreign companies incorporate maquiladoras to take advantage of less expensive labor and tax incentives.

On November 1, 2006, the Mexican government issued a Federal Decree to Promote Manufacturing, Maquila and Export Service Industry (IMMEX Decree) in an effort to spur the Mexican economy, and to reduce administrative and logistical costs. The IMMEX program includes the Development and Operation of the Maquila Export Industry and the Temporary Import Programs to Produce Export Goods (PITEX).

The IMMEX Program allows Mexican companies to temporarily import goods owned by foreign residents in order to process, transform, or repair them to be exported outside of Mexico or to provide the foreign resident export services. Generally, if certain requirements are met, the Maquila program provides the following benefits: (1) no permanent establishment is created by the foreign resident in Mexico, (2) imported goods are free of import tax and value added tax, and (3) in certain cases the foreign resident is relieved from complying with certain customs and tax obligations.

The goods are classified as (1) raw materials, (2) shipping containers and boxes, (3) machinery, equipment, tools, spare parts, among others.

The Mexican Ministry of Economy maintains the right to authorize Mexican companies to act as Maquiladoras under the IMMEX Program. Maquiladoras under the IMMEX program must commit to annual sales of at least USD $500,000.00 (or its equivalent in Mexican pesos), or to invoice exports for at least 10% of its total turnover.

The Maquila process involves the following:

The foreign resident provides all the necessary raw materials, machinery, and equipment in order for the Maquiladora to carry out the manufacturing process in Mexico. Under the IMMEX Program, custom duties and VAT tax are not paid on the temporary import of the goods. The Maquiladora manufactures the product with the goods owned by the foreign resident. The Maquiladora invoices the total costs and expenses regarding the “maquila” process plus a mark-up to the foreign resident. The finished product is returned (exported) to the foreign resident. The export of the goods and services is subject to a 0% VAT.

Maquiladoras are subject to a specific tax regime and must comply with several requirements to access the benefits under the IMMEX Program.

This article provides a general overview of the Mexican Income Tax implications that should be considered by foreign investors engaged in the Maquila industry.

Maquiladora – Mexican Income Tax implications

As of 2014, Maquiladoras had two alternatives to comply with their transfer pricing obligations and avoid creating a permanent establishment in Mexico:

To determine taxable income by considering the highest amount obtained from the 6.9% over the assets used in the tax year and the 6.5% over the costs and operating expenses of the tax year (Safe Harbor) for Mexican income tax purposes. To request to the tax authorities a special ruling regarding the transfer pricing methodology used by the Maquiladora with its related parties in terms of article 34-A of the Federal fiscal Code.

The tax authorities in the APA ruling confirm whether the transfer pricing procedure used to determine Maquila’s taxable income complies with the transfer pricing rules under Sections 179 and 180 of the Mexican Income Tax Law, or not. In other words, if the consideration agreed between the Maquiladora and its related parties would have been agreed by third parties (Advance Pricing Agreement or APA).

To continue applying the APA, a Maquiladora must comply with all of the requirements necessary to demonstrate that transactions carried out with a related party are at fair market value and comply with the applicable transfer pricing rules.

The APA reduces the risk of a transfer pricing audit. Additionally, an APA ruling has a statute of limitations of 5 years of its issuance. The APA provides an alternative to applying a lower taxable income in comparison with the Safe Harbor methodology. Therefore, the majority of the Maquiladoras in Mexico opted to apply APA instead of the Safe Harbor.

Most of the foreign residents with Maquiladoras in Mexico are based in the United States of America (U.S.) due to the proximity between the two countries. The Mexican Tax Administration Service (SAT) and the IRS agreed that the income tax paid in Mexico attributable to the business of the foreign company in Mexico regarding the Maquila would be creditable in the U.S. for tax purposes under the Mexico-U.S. tax treaty to avoid double taxation (Qualified Maquila Approach or fast track).

In 2022, the Mexican Income Tax Law (IT Law) was reformed and the option to request an APA was repealed. Nonetheless, the IT Law provided an alternative to request for an APA for the tax year 2021, which will be in force as of 2024. Therefore, the Maquila companies that requested an APA in 2021 will have to apply the Safe Harbor method as of 2025.

A Maquiladora that applies the Safe Harbor method instead of the APA will have a higher taxable income and the profit sharing for the employees (PTU) will be increased. This means that this will represent a higher cost for the foreign residents that have a Maquila in Mexico.

Therefore, foreign residents should analyze the following alternatives: (1) restructuring operations in Mexico, (2) creating a permanent establishment in Mexico (e.g., pay as a Mexican company), or (3) applying the Safe Harbor Method. The best alternative will depend on which is more beneficial for the foreign resident investing in Mexico on a case-by-case basis.

Expert Tax Attorneys

Have questions or need help with the topics discussed in this Insights postFreeman Law’s International Tax attorneys can help! We offer value-driven services and provide practical solutions to complex tax issuesSchedule a consultation today!

The post Maquiladora Program appeared first on Freeman Law.

(Originally posted by Stephanie Uribe)
Continue reading
  25 Hits

The Best Solution For Family Law & Legal Advice Today That One May Learn

While the vote to legalize marijuana was a second of celebration for many, its possession and distribution nonetheless stay consequential. It can be crucial for customers and future users to make sure they are complying with state legal guidelines to stop useless legal entanglements. Cheaper isn’t always better with regards to hiring legal recommendation. However […]

The post The Best Solution For Family Law & Legal Advice Today That One May Learn first appeared on Family in Law.

(Originally posted by Teel)
Continue reading
  24 Hits

What Is the Statute of Limitations for a Wrongful Death Claim in Texas?

If someone close to you died due to someone else’s wrongful actions, you might have grounds to file a wrongful death claim. In Texas, surviving family members and personal representatives of the decedent’s estate normally have two years to file a wrongful death lawsuit. However, this strictly enforced deadline also comes with several notable exceptions.

Do not hesitate to speak to an experienced wrongful death attorney if you have lost a loved one in an accident at little to no fault of their own. You and your family may be entitled to significant legal compensation. The legal team at Fleming Law is standing by to help. Contact us today for a free consultation. Read on to learn more about wrongful death lawsuits in Texas.

What Is a Wrongful Death Action?

In Texas, a wrongful death action allows surviving loved ones to seek legal compensation from anyone who caused a family member’s death through a “wrongful act, neglect, carelessness, unskillfulness, or default.” If the defendant is shown to be at fault for the decedent’s death, they will be legally responsible for compensating survivors for both the economic and non-economic aspects of their loss.

However, it is also important to note the distinction between a wrongful death action and a survival action. Whereas a wrongful death claim seeks to compensate surviving loved ones for their losses, a survival action is a claim made on behalf of a fatally injured victim who is no longer around to pursue compensation for themselves. Proceeds from a survival action pour into the decedent’s estate, after which they are usually distributed to surviving heirs.

Who Can Bring a Wrongful Death Claim in Texas?

Under the governing statute, only specific individuals close to the decedent have the immediate legal power to file a wrongful death lawsuit. Specifically, surviving spouses, children, and parents of the deceased can file a lawsuit in Texas as soon as the death occurs. One of these individuals may file on behalf of all eligible persons. Alternatively, they may each file on their own behalf.

If a surviving spouse, child, or parent does not file a wrongful death claim within three months of their loved one’s death, the personal representative of the decedent’s estate can file instead. However, if the eligible survivors explicitly and unanimously ask the representative not to sue, they must honor the request.

A personal representative is an individual approved to handle the distribution of the decedent’s estate. If appointed in the decedent’s will, the personal representative is also known as an “executor.” If they are appointed by a court in the absence of a will, they are also known as an “administrator.”

What Compensation is Available in a Wrongful Death Claim?

Though money will not undo the devastating impact a wrongful death is likely to have on surviving family members, the law nonetheless tries to provide a measure of justice and accountability. The attorneys at Fleming Law can help you and your family pursue a wide variety of compensation for your loved one’s death, including things like:

Costs incurred treating their fatal injuries Funeral, burial, and cremation expenses Lost income they would have provided to the family Loss of their care, maintenance, services, support, and advice Loss of companionship, comfort, love, and society Psychological pain, grief, and anguish stemming from the loss

How Long Do I Have to File a Wrongful Death Claim in Texas?

Again, in Texas, the statute of limitations governing wrongful deaths gives you two years to file a lawsuit seeking compensation from the at-fault party. This two-year window begins on the date of death. For example, if your loved one dies on impact in a catastrophic car crash, the two-year countdown starts on the date of the accident. However, if they die days or weeks after the accident due to their injuries, it begins at the moment they pass away.

What Are the Consequences of Missing the Deadline?

If you try to file a lawsuit after the two-year deadline has passed, the defendant will almost certainly file a motion asking the court to dismiss your claim. Subject to few exceptions, the presiding judge will be legally obligated to grant the motion.

This result will have a devastating effect on your case. Not only will it destroy your right to seek compensation in court, it will also destroy your bargaining power in out-of-court settlement negotiations with the at-fault party.

When Can the Statute of Limitations Be Extended?

Though the statute of limitations is strictly enforced, it does come with a few narrow exceptions. The standard two-year deadline can be extended (“tolled”) in the following circumstances:

You are a minor who lost your parent – If a minor loses a parent to a wrongful death, the two-year time limit does not start running until their eighteenth birthday. In other words, they will have until their twentieth birthday to file a wrongful death lawsuit. However, a surviving parent or guardian can file a claim on their behalf before they reach legal adulthood. You are of unsound mind – The deadline can also be extended if you are not able to file a claim in time because you were of “unsound mind” when your loved one died. Though rarely invoked, this rule may come into play if, for example, your loved one was killed in an accident that simultaneously left you in a prolonged coma. The other party’s liability was not obvious – If you had no way of knowing that another party’s negligent or intentional behavior caused your loved one’s death, the two-year time limit does not begin counting down until you could have reasonably discovered the true cause. This is known as the “discovery rule.” The other party fraudulently concealed their liability – The two-year countdown is paused if the at-fault party deliberately tried to conceal their liability. If this occurs, you have two years from the date you learn of the concealment to file a lawsuit.

Contact a Wrongful Death Lawyer in Texas Today

At the end of the day, nothing will ever compensate for the loss of a beloved family member. Even so, the law provides an avenue to seek accountability and justice. At Fleming Law, we are ready to make sure you know your full legal rights and options. Our team of knowledgeable, compassionate wrongful death attorneys is standing by to answer any questions you may have. Contact us today to schedule a free consultation.

The post What Is the Statute of Limitations for a Wrongful Death Claim in Texas? appeared first on Fleming Law, P.C..

(Originally posted by Nicholas Fleming)
Continue reading
  25 Hits

How to prove an equitable adoption took place in Texas?

Adopting a child is a life-altering experience, and it’s no different in Texas. But the Lone Star State has some unique laws when it comes to adoption that you should be aware of if you’re planning on going through with the process. In this blog post, we’ll discuss one of those laws in particular: how […]

The post How to prove an equitable adoption took place in Texas? appeared first on Kreig LLC.

(Originally posted by Jack Manhire)
Continue reading
  22 Hits

Judges Weigh Juror Misconduct Claims in Boston Marathon Bomber's Latest Death Penalty Appeal

Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's lastest challenge to his death sentence centers on social media posts that two jurors failed to disclose to the trial court. First Circuit Judge William Kayatta questioned whether scrutinizing jurors' social media posts and messages would be "opening the floodgates."

     
Continue reading
  26 Hits

Twitter Feed

Law Links

State Bar of Texas The State Bar of Texas serves its members and the public.
Texas Bar Today Texas Bar Today is an online media network featuring curated news and commentary from Texas legal professionals.
Family Law Section The mission of the Family Law Section is to promote the highest degree of professionalism, education, fellowship, and excellence in the practice of family law.
Business Law Section The Business Law Section of the State Bar of Texas covers the complex and expanding fields of corporate, securities, commercial, banking and bankruptcy law.
REPTL Real Estate, Probate and Trust Law, Section of the State Bar of Texas

-Free consultation-