RW TEX-LAW Feeds

Great collection of legal web feeds and RSS articles. All links go directly to the articles and publisher information is posted.

RW TEX-LAW Attorneys at law - Your Cypress, Houston, Texas Lawyers

Secretary Cascos reminds voters of Feb. 1 Registration Deadline

Today, Texas Secretary of State Carlos Cascos reminded Texans that February 1 is the deadline to register in time for the March 1 Primary Election.
Continue reading
  4037 Hits
  0 Comments
4037 Hits
0 Comments

Ready to Ride the Litigation Finance Wave? More Lawyers and Clients Say ‘Yes’ to Funding

Originally published by Texas Lawyer.

Third-party litigation funding is having a moment. Vannin Capital Managing Director Scott Mozarsky explains its biggest selling points.

       

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: Texas Lawyer
Continue reading
  478 Hits
  0 Comments
478 Hits
0 Comments

Texas Cell Phone Laws

Originally published by Hank Stout.

Texas’ new texting and driving laws take effect September 2019. Here’s everything you need to know.

Texas’ New Texting While Driving Law At-a-Glance:

Effective Sept. 1, 2019, texting while driving will be illegal across the state of Texas as the result of a new texting-while-driving ban passed by the Texas legislature.  The law will prohibit motorists from reading, writing or sending electronic messages while driving.

As of September, texting while driving within the state of Texas will be punishable by a fine of $25-99 for first time offenders, and $100-200 for repeat offenders (although no points will be assessed).

Texas Cell Phone & Texting While Driving Laws

The new law also states that if an accident caused by texting and driving results in the death or serious bodily injury of another person, the driver can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed $4,000, or confinement in jail for a term not to exceed one year (in addition to any other charges/punishments). 

Nearly 1.6 Million Distracted Driving Accidents Nationwide Yearly

“One in five crashes in Texas is caused by distracted driving,” said Texas Department of Transportation Executive Director James Bass. “We are pleased the Texas Legislature recognizes the extreme danger caused by texting and driving. The new law sends a very clear message to Texans to put down their phones and focus on the road. We are hopeful this new law will help save lives and reduce injuries.”

In 2018, 109,658 traffic crashes in Texas involved distracted driving. Those crashes resulted in 455 deaths and 3,087 serious injuries.

Texas Texting and Driving Law 2017

In 2017, the Texas Legislature passed a statewide ban on using a wireless communications device for electronic messaging while operating a motor vehicle.  

For those under 18 years of age, Texas law already bans all cell phone use while driving, including hands-free, except in the case of emergencies. 

Additionally, drivers are currently banned from texting and using hand-held cellular devices while driving in school zones. School bus operators also are prohibited from using cell phones while driving if children are present.

Exceptions to the new law include emergency communication or electronic messaging when the vehicle is stopped.

It’s important to note that this new law only addresses “reading, writing, or sending electronic messages” via a “wireless communication device.” It is still legal for motorists in most cities to use their phone for GPS navigation, music apps, dialing phone numbers, etc., but drivers may still get pulled over if an officer suspects them of texting.

Many local areas have passed stricter ordinances which completely limit any cell phone use while driving, so it is the responsibility of drivers to learn the laws in their local areas.  

Local Cell Phone Laws Vary in Many Texas Cities

Drivers should be aware that some cities have additional ordinances that are more restrictive.

Not every city has adopted stricter cell phone laws, but since 2009, more than 90 cities and towns across the state have decided to crack down even harder on the use of cell phones while driving.  Additional restrictions in many of these municipalities include the following bans:

Receiving text messages and reading them while operating a motor vehicle Sending text messages while driving No one with a learner’s permit may use a cell phone in the car for six months following the issuance of their learner’s permit Anyone under the age of 18 is prohibited from using a cell phone in any capacity while driving School bus drivers are not permitted to touch their cell phones in a bus if there are children on the bus with them No one is permitted to use a cell phone in any capacity in a school zone

Not all cities and towns have implemented these laws yet, which is why the safest bet is simply to place cell phones out of reach while driving—regardless of where you travel in Texas.  

At least 45 Texas cities have gone above and beyond by enacting more-strict hands-free ordinances within their jurisdictions. These cities include:

Alice Amarillo Anthony Aransas Pass Argyle Austin Bedford Bee Cave Boerne Buda Corpus Christi Deer Park Denton El Paso Floresville Garden Ridge Hill Country Village Hurst, Kingsville Kyle Lake Dallas Lake Tanglewood Lakeway Laredo Liberty Hill Little Elm Midlothian Mont Belvieu New Braunfels Port Aransas Rollingwood San Antonio San Juan San Marcos Schertz Sinton Socorro Sunset Valley University City Watauga West Lake Hills Wichita Falls Wimberley

Click here to view a list of cities with stricter cell phone laws

Take Texas Cell Phone Laws Seriously

The safest policy is to drive now and use your cell phone later.  If you must make a phone call or send a text, pull over. Otherwise, wait until you reach your destination to use the phone.  

All it takes is a split-second for something to go wrong on the road.  If you find it too difficult to let go of your cell phone habits while driving, you may want to try the following strategies: 

Consider placing your phone somewhere you cannot reach while driving Turn the notification sounds off so you aren’t distracted when someone is trying to reach you.   Consider downloading safe driving apps that help prevent distracted driving.  Pull over to make calls or send text messages 

If there is something so important it simply cannot wait for your attention, safely pull over in a safe, well-lit area and respond to your call, text, or message.  

The simplest thing is to not use your phone at all while driving.  It’s the safest thing you can do for yourself and everyone else who is on the road with you.

The post Texas Cell Phone Laws appeared first on Sutliff & Stout, Injury & Accident Law Firm.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: Hank Stout
Continue reading
  426 Hits
  0 Comments
426 Hits
0 Comments

IRS Sending Letters to Taxpayers with Potential Taxable Virtual Currency Transactions (7/26/19)

Originally published by Jack Townsend.

In IR-2019-132, here, the IRS announced that it is “sending letters to taxpayers with virtual currency transactions that potentially failed to report income and pay the resulting tax from virtual currency transactions or did not report their transactions properly.”  By the end of August, the notice says, more than 10,000 taxpayers will receive the letters.

The Notice further says:

“Taxpayers should take these letters very seriously by reviewing their tax filings and when appropriate, amend past returns and pay back taxes, interest and penalties,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “The IRS is expanding our efforts involving virtual currency, including increased use of data analytics. We are focused on enforcing the law and helping taxpayers fully understand and meet their obligations.”

The Notice concludes with this:

Taxpayers who do not properly report the income tax consequences of virtual currency transactions are, when appropriate, liable for tax, penalties and interest. In some cases, taxpayers could be subject to criminal prosecution.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: Jack Townsend
Continue reading
  457 Hits
  0 Comments
457 Hits
0 Comments

Can I Name a Relative Who Lives Abroad as Guardian of My Children?

Originally published by Rania Combs.

A colleague in a listserv to which I subscribe asked an interesting question: Can parents name a relative who lives in a foreign country as guardian of their children?

Here’s the situation: The clients are foreign nationals permanently residing in US, and their children are US citizens, having been born in this country.

Neither husband nor wife have any next of kin residing in the United States. As part of their estate planning, they want to name a relative who lives abroad as guardian in the case of their incapacity or death.

This happens every day in our very mobile world. Most of us have family members who live in different states in our country, and the United States is home to people from countries all over the world who may still have family living abroad.

And most people would agree in considering the best interest of a child, it would be better for a child who is orphaned to be cared for by relatives that a parent selects, even if they reside overseas, than foster parents who may be complete strangers.

The plain language of the statutes support the idea that a next of kin who is a nonresident can be appointed as a guardian, as long as a resident agent to accept service of process is appointed:

Section 1104.052 of the Estates Code relating to guardianship for minor orphans says that a nearest ascendant “is entitled to guardianship” of the person, and if no ascendant exists, the court “shall appoint” the nearest next of kin. That language appears to be mandatory rather than permissive. Section 1104.103 of the Estates Code provides that a court “shall appoint” the person designated in the Will or declaration to serve as guardian in preference to any other person otherwise entitled to serve unless the court finds that the person designated as guardian is disqualified, is deceased , or refuses to serve. Again, this language appears mandatory rather than permissive. To read about what disqualifies a guardian, read: People Ineligible to be Appointed as Guardian. Additionally, Section 1104.357 of the Estates Code provides, “[a]person may not be appointed guardian if the person is a nonresident who has failed to file with the court the name of a resident agent to accept service of process in all actions or proceedings relating to the guardianship.” This suggests that a nonresident who appoints a resident agent to accept service of process is eligible to serve as guardian.

Although there is a section in the Estates code that gives the court discretion to remove a guardian who is absent from the state for a period of three or more months without the court’s permission or moves out of state, nonresidence is not a per-se disqualifying factor.

The only case law I have found pertinent to this issue is Ramirez vs. Garcia de Bretado, a case out of the El Paso Court of Appeals. It involved a maternal grandmother and resident of Mexico, who had been appointed guardian of orphaned children.

The paternal uncle challenged the appointment claiming that nonresidency disqualified the grandmother. The court disagreed, writing that Texas law does not prohibit the appointment of a nonresident as guardian and found, based on the statute I mentioned above, that there is a presumption that the maternal grandmother was the best qualified person to be guardian (even though she resided in Mexico).

Note however, colleagues have warned that what is technically supported by statute and case law does not necessarily guarantee how a court will rule. One colleague described a case in which he was involved where a judge prevented a terminal parent from naming her sister, a citizen and resident of a foreign another country, as guardian, reasoning that if the children were taken to that country, the court would not have the jurisdiction to protect the children.

As a result, if you intend to name a foreign national as guardian, it is wise to also name an alternate who resides in the United States, so that you have certainty that a guardian of your choice, even if not your first choice, will be appointed.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: Rania Combs
Continue reading
  372 Hits
  0 Comments
372 Hits
0 Comments

Free legal help available for people affected by flooding in 3 South Texas counties

Originally published by Amy Starnes.

Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, the State Bar of Texas, the American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division (ABA YLD), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and other organizations are partnering to provide legal and recovery assistance to people affected by severe storms and flooding that occurred in Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy counties on June 24 and 25.

A toll-free legal hotline (866-757-1570) is available to connect low-income individuals affected by the disaster with local legal aid providers who can help with:

Assistance securing government benefits as they are made available to disaster victims; Assistance with life, medical, and property insurance claims; Help with home repair contracts and contractors; Replacement of wills and other important legal documents lost or destroyed in the disaster; Consumer protection issues such as price-gouging and avoiding contractor scams in the rebuilding process; Counseling on mortgage-foreclosure problems; and Counseling on landlord-tenant problems

Individuals who qualify for assistance will be matched with Texas lawyers who can provide free, limited legal help. Requestors should be aware that there are some limitations on disaster legal services. For example, assistance is not available for cases that will produce a fee (i.e., those cases where attorneys are paid part of the settlement by the court). Such cases are referred to a local lawyer referral service.

For more information, read the full news release.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: Amy Starnes
Continue reading
  376 Hits
  0 Comments
376 Hits
0 Comments

Fidelity’s National Financial Services Orders GPB Private Placements Removed

Originally published by P. Clarkson Collins Jr..

National Financial Services, which is Fidelity Investments’ clearing and custody unit, has given its brokerage firm clients 90 days to get rid of all GPB Capital Holdings private placements from its platform. The announcement means that investors and their financial advisers will have to move their GPB fund assets to a different custodial firm. Considering that there are a lot of broker-dealers who use National Financial as their primary custodial firm and to clear the investments of clients, the decision is likely to impact a lot of parties.

A main reason for the edict is that, reportedly, neither Fidelity nor National Financial are clear about the actual value of the GPB private placements. Third-party vendors typically provide this information. According to InvestmentNews, Fidelity spokesperson Nicole Abbott said that at the moment GPB is not meeting her company’s policy regarding alternative investments.

In Trouble with Investors and Regulators
The news is another blow to GPB, which has been in a lot of trouble with regulators, investors, and even a former partner. With a portfolio holding over 160 companies and investing mostly in trash hauling companies and car dealerships, its private placement funds have plunged in value significantly. The GPB funds, which were once together valued at $1.8B, are now worth around $1.1B.

Investors, meantime, have lost around $600M in the process while, reported InvestmentNews, brokers and their firms reportedly earned around $167M in commissions from the transactions. With private placements, it is common practice for a broker to make a 7% commission from a sale, with another 2% fee going to the broker-dealer.

Brokerage Firms Under Scrutiny for GPB Sales
Over 60 broker-dealers, including Purshe Kaplan Sterling, Woodbury Financial Services, SagePoint Financial, and Royal Alliance Associates have sold GPB funds. Questions are now being raised about what any of these firms knew about the private placements even as they were selling them to investors.

For example, late last year, ex-Purshe Kaplan Sterling Investments compliance officer Toni Caiazzo Neff filed a lawsuit accusing the firm of firing her after she brought up concerns about how the broker-dealer went about approving alternative investments such as GPB Holdings.

The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) are reportedly investigating GPB, as is the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which raided the GPB office in New York earlier this year. In September, Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth William Galvin announced that he was investigating 63 brokerage firms that sold GPB-controlled partnerships.

Also not happy with GPB is Patrick Dibre, one of its former operating partners. They are suing each other, with Dibre last year accusing GPB Capital Holdings controllers Jeffrey Schneider and David Gentile of using funds to support their lavish lifestyle, including $550K for a plane in August 2017. Gentile also allegedly paid his dad’s accounting firm $100K a month for services that were either never rendered or overbilled.

Dibre contends that GPB sued him to conceal the fact that the company was being run like a Ponzi scam and sustaining losses.

GPB Investor Fraud Claims
If you or someone you know suffered losses from investing in GPB Capital private placements, you may have grounds for pursuing a claim for broker fraud against the advisor or broker-dealer that sold you the investments. Our GPB private placement fraud lawyers have been working with clients nationwide in filing their claims for losses and damages. Contact Shepherd Smith Edwards and Kantas LLP (SSEK Law Firm) today.

The post Fidelity’s National Financial Services Orders GPB Private Placements Removed appeared first on Securities Fraud Attorney.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: P. Clarkson Collins Jr.
Continue reading
  709 Hits
  0 Comments
709 Hits
0 Comments

Rent-to-own Owners Receive New Protections Against Criminal Charges

Originally published by Broden & Mickelsen LLP.

Many people who rent-to-own furniture and other goods in Texas don’t realize failing to make payments can result in criminal charges or even a term in jail.

However, a bill enacted this summer by the Texas legislature has helped close a loophole that allowed people who could not afford to make payments to be prosecuted.

For years, companies in Texas have been able to file criminal charges against people who fail to make payment for their products under rent-to-own contracts.

A clause added to the Texas Penal Code in 1977 allows felony charges and up to two years in jail for people who default on payments for furniture. The Texas Tribune reported rent-to-own companies have pressed charges against thousands of Texas. Some of them made most of their payments and others returned the loaned items.  The ability to press charges for unpaid bills is unique to the rent-to-own industry and is only allowed in certain states. The Tribune reported only two people testified in favor of the bill in 1977: a pair of lobbyists for the rental industry. No one opposed it.

Critics of the law likened it to a debtor’s prison. Earlier this year, a new bill tackled the unconstitutional prosecution of people for their inability to make payments to the rent-to-own companies.

A new law that comes into force in September will prevent rent-to-own companies from prosecuting people who are unable to keep up with payments under Texas’ “theft of service” statute.

However, the rent-to-own companies will still be able to press for charges against people who try to abscond with goods or are ill-intentioned. It removes the original presumption that customers who don’t return goods or respond to a certified letter after they miss a payment intend to steal the goods.

The Tribune reported consumer advocates, criminal prosecutors, and rent-to-own companies including Rent-A-Center based in Plano, provided input into the bill that was signed by Governor Greg Abbott on June 14. The bill was sponsored by state Sen. Morris Miles who said rent-to-own companies, which are used by many low-income people, habitually use the criminal justice system to collect on debts that should be handled using civil remedies.

However, the change may strengthen the hand of rent-to-own companies against people accused of willful failure to pay. It reduces the time certain renters have to respond to a letter before a company can press charges.

The theft-of-service statute still applies to traditional rental businesses that lease cars, heavy machinery, and other tools. Rent-to-own companies can press prosecutors to file theft charges against their people if it’s clear the renter intended to steal the property.

Our experienced Dallas defense attorneys can help you if you have been charged with a crime under the ‘theft of service’ statute or any other offense. Please call us today at (214) 720-9552.

The post Rent-to-own Owners Receive New Protections Against Criminal Charges appeared first on Dallas Criminal Defense Attorneys |State & Federal Lawyers.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: Broden & Mickelsen LLP
Continue reading
  411 Hits
  0 Comments
411 Hits
0 Comments

Memo to Law Firm CMOs: Don’t Skimp on Those Partner Bios

Originally published by Texas Lawyer.

 

A new survey tracks differences in the ways in-house counsel, C-suite executives and law firm marketing chiefs consume and promote information.
      

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: Texas Lawyer
Continue reading
  438 Hits
  0 Comments
438 Hits
0 Comments

Article on You Settled it, Right? Family Settlement Agreements in Probate, Trust, and Guardianship Disputes

Originally published by Gerry W. Beyer.

J. Ellen Bennett, Mark R. Caldwell, & Donovan Campbell, Jr. recently Article entitled, You Settled it, Right? Family Settlement Agreements in Probate, Trust, and Guardianship Disputes, 11 Tex. Tech Est. Plan. Com. Prop. LJ, 213-254 (2019). Provided below is an…

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: Gerry W. Beyer
Continue reading
  445 Hits
  0 Comments
445 Hits
0 Comments

What Legal Teams Need to Know About Ransomware

Originally published by Texas Lawyer.

It’s 9 a.m. on a Monday after a long weekend. You arrive at your downtown office prepared to tackle a brief for the new multinational corporation you

       

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.

Original author: Texas Lawyer
Continue reading
  736 Hits
  0 Comments
736 Hits
0 Comments

Register now for TAPS 2019

The State Bar of Texas Paralegal Division will host the 2019 Texas Advanced Paralegal Seminar from September 18 to 20 at the DoubleTree in Austin.

“There’s No Place Like TAPS” will include CLE, socials, a keynote luncheon, and the Paralegal Division Annual Meeting on September 20.

The keynote luncheon speaker will be Judge Darlene Byrne, of the 126th Judicial District Court in Travis County. She is a commissioner on the Texas Children’s Commission; serves on the Judicial Council for National CASA; is an advisory council member for TexProtects, Partnerships for Children, and the Seedling Foundation; chair of the Texas Statewide Collaborative for Trauma-Informed Care; and on the editorial review board for the National Council for Juvenile and Family Court Judges’ Juvenile and Family Court Journal. Byrne is a member of the Travis County Juvenile Justice board and a founding team member of the Travis County Family Drug Treatment Court and the Travis County Model Court of Children, Youth and Families.

Other highlighted speakers include M. Jack Martin, president of Martin, Frost & Hill in Austin; Leigh De La Reza, a partner in Noelke Maples St. Ledger Bryant in Austin; and Judy Kostura, of Judge, Kostura & Putman in Austin.

TAPS attendees can earn up to 13 hours of advanced CLE during the seminar.

Additionally, a panel of paralegals certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization will be on hand to answer questions about preparing for and taking the TBLS certification exam.

Registration opened on June 1 and can be completed at txpd.org/TAPS. The deadline for early registration is August 6. All registrations after will include a $35 late fee.

Original author: Adam Faderewski
Continue reading
  455 Hits
  0 Comments
455 Hits
0 Comments

Veterans can receive legal advice through HBF Saturday clinics

The Houston Bar Foundation’s Veterans Legal Initiative continues its traveling Saturday legal clinics of the summer with a stop in Tomball on July 13.

The Veterans Legal Initiative hosts the clinic along with the Houston Northwest Bar Association and the Montgomery County Bar Association.

The clinic will offer veterans and spouses of deceased veterans advice and counsel from volunteer attorneys in any area of law, including family law, wills and probate, consumer law, real estate and tax law, and disability and veterans benefits. Those who qualify for legal aid and are in need of ongoing legal representation may be assigned a pro bono attorney to take their case.

The clinic, which does not require an appointment, will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Tomball VA Outpatient Clinic, 1200 W. Main St., Tomball 77375.

Additional Saturday clinics:

Galveston (Galveston VA Outpatient Clinic, 3828 Ave. N., 77550)—July 27, 9 a.m. – noon. Lake Jackson (Lake Jackson VA Outpatient Clinic, 208 Oak Drive S., 77566)—August 10, 9 a.m. – noon. Katy (Katy VA Outpatient Clinic, 750 Westgreen Blvd., 77450)—September 14, 9 a.m. – noon.

For more information, go to hba.org or contact the Veterans Legal Initiative at 713-759-1133.

To view a list of other free veteran legal clinics around the state, please go to the State Bar’s Texas Lawyers for Texas Veterans webpage at texasbar.com/veterans.

Original author: Eric Quitugua
Continue reading
  571 Hits
  0 Comments
571 Hits
0 Comments

Two Texas attorneys named to Fastcase 50 list of top innovators

Two Texas attorneys were included in the annual Fastcase 50 list, which honors top innovators in the legal field.

Michael Dreeben, retired deputy solicitor general for the U.S. Department of Justice, and Shawn Tuma, a partner in Spencer Fane, were named to the list alongside other attorneys, professors, and entrepreneurs from around the world.

Dreeben was honored for his criminal law work with the Department of Justice. He is one of only seven people to have tried more than 100 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. Dreeben argued his first Supreme Court case in 1989, against now-Chief Justice John Roberts.

Tuma was recognized for his cybersecurity work, including cyberrisk management, incident response, and security for a variety of companies in and outside of the law. In addition to providing consulting services to clients, he also sometimes represents them in related litigation. Tuma is an officer of the State Bar of Texas Computer & Technology Section.

Original author: Adam Faderewski
Continue reading
  787 Hits
  0 Comments
787 Hits
0 Comments

In Memoriam — June 2019

The State Bar of Texas’ Membership Department was informed in June 2019 of the deaths of these members. We join the officers and directors of the State Bar in expressing our deepest sympathy.

• Frederick P. Ahrens, 81, of Dallas, died May 29, 2019. He received his law degree from Marquette University Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1978.
• William A. Allen, 71, of Austin, died April 21, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1976.
• James Wade Campbell, 77, of Richardson, died May 11, 2018. He received his law degree from Southern Methodist University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1966.
• Christopher Albert Clark II, 81, of Oro Valley, Arizona, died October 5, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1993.
• Stanley Crawford, 75, of Austin, died May 25, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1967.
• Richard B. Davies, 96, of Houston, died April 13, 2017. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law and was admitted to the State Bar in 1952.
• Timothy Flint Davis, 83, died July 22, 2017. He received his law degree from the University of Denver College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1969.
• John W. Dixon, 94, died March 19, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1948.
• Cornelius T. Dorans, 88, of Plano, died May 23, 2017. He received his law degree from New York University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1992.
• Lee Duggan Jr., 87, of Houston, died June 16, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1955.
• Billy W. Flanagan, 67, of Mount Pleasant, died October 8, 2018. He received his law degree from Southern Methodist University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1976.
• Word Lee Gidden, 98, of Elgin, died April 30, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1949.
• Leon G. Halden Jr., 83, of Kingwood, died February 6, 2019. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1960.
• Edward Heller, 82, of Houston, died April 25, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Buffalo School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1979.
• B.J. Lange Hoffman, 85, of New Braunfels, died May 7, 2019. He received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1961.
• Walter M. Holcombe, 84, of League City, died March 26, 2018. He received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1971.
• Steven Huff, 67, of Mequon, Wisconsin, died May 22, 2019. He received his law degree from Boston University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 2009.
• Richard P. Keeton, 81, of Houston, died April 20, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1963.
• John Moore Killian, 84, of San Antonio, died May 16, 2019. He received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1965.
• Davey Lamb, 66, of Dallas, died November 18, 2018. He received his law degree from Southern Methodist University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1979.
• Christopher Lane, 67, of Florida, died April 5, 2019. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1978.
• Robert E. Lang, 75, of San Antonio, died April 26, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Akron School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1990.
• Kennard Lawrence, 76, of Burton, died April 23, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Washington School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1968.
• Vincent Ka-Lin Lo, 68, of Sugar Land, died January 29, 2019. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1997.
• Eugene O. Marquette III, 85, of Cookeville, Tennessee, died November 5, 2018. He received his law degree from Western State College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1987.
• Leonard N. Martin, 88, of Boerne, died July 22, 2017. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1961.
• Carol M. McGilvray, 63, of Shreveport, Louisiana, died October 21, 2018. She received her law degree from Loyola University New Orleans College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1979.
• Herbert H. Medsger, 90, of League City, died June 18, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Houston Law Center and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1969.
• Gary C. Miller, 63, of Hot Springs, Arkansas, died August 25, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1980.
• Jerry Doyle Miller, 69, of Destin, Florida, died September 20, 2018. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1973.
• Sean Arleigh Moore, 71, of Houston, died December 4, 2018. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1977.
• William Neil, 79, of Dallas, died May 29, 2019. He received his law degree from Southern Methodist University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1966.
• Albert Perez, 74, of Fort Worth, died May 2, 2019. He received his law degree from Texas Tech University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1974.
• Jack G. Ponder, 93, of Richardson, died September 12, 2018. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1952.
• Noe Reyna, 61, of Corpus Christi, died May 21, 2019. He received his law degree from Harvard Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1985.
• Mary Elizabeth Rogers, 61, of Corpus Christi, died May 18, 2019. She received her law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1991.
• Charles A. Rubiola Jr., 70, of San Antonio, died March 29, 2019. He received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1975.
• Richard Edric Salisbury, 48, of Austin, died April 28, 2019. He received his law degree from Columbia Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 2001.
• John Shannon, 67, of League City, died May 21, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Michigan Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1976.
• Stephen Shoultz, 63, of Fort Worth, died June 23, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Toledo College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1980.
• Malcom Carey Smith, 75, of Johnson City, died June 2, 2019. He received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1967.
• Cavitt Foster Wendlandt, 59, of Austin, died June 10, 2019. He received his law degree from Texas Tech University School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1987.
• David Vandiver Wilson II, 51, of Houston, died June 3, 2019. He received his law degree from South Texas College of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1993.
• William H. Yowell, 88, of Killeen, died February 6, 2017. He received his law degree from Baylor Law School and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1951.
• Thomas Michael Zulim, 60, of Hockley, died December 28, 2018. He received his law degree from the University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law and was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1992.

If you would like to have a memorial for a loved one published in the Texas Bar Journal, please go to texasbar.com/memorials. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact the Texas Bar Journal at 512-427-1701 or toll-free at 800-204-2222, ext. 1701.

Original author: Adam Faderewski
Continue reading
  1246 Hits
  0 Comments
1246 Hits
0 Comments

Secretary Whitley Convenes First Border Trade Advisory Committee Meeting Of 2019

"Texas Secretary of State David Whitley today convened the first Border Trade Advisory Committee (BTAC) meeting of 2019, bringing together stakeholders from throughout the Texas-Mexico border region to advance initiatives to address challenges related to international trade with Mexico."
Continue reading
  586 Hits
  0 Comments
586 Hits
0 Comments

ICYMI: Secretary Whitley Participates In Voting Rights History Tour In Alabama With Secretaries Of State

"Last week, Texas Secretary of State David Whitley joined 19 other statewide election officials from across the nation to participate in the first-ever voting rights history tour in Alabama. "
Continue reading
  483 Hits
  0 Comments
483 Hits
0 Comments

Secretary Whitley Announces Settlement In Litigation On Voter Registration List Maintenance Activity

"Today, the parties to LULAC v. Whitley (and consolidated cases) agreed to a settlement in the litigation regarding the Texas Secretary of State's voter registration list maintenance activity announced on January 25, 2019 to identify and remove non-U.S. citizens registered to vote in Texas."
Continue reading
  635 Hits
  0 Comments
635 Hits
0 Comments

Secretary Whitley Encourages Texans To Vote Early, Make Preparations To Cast A Ballot In May 4th Election

"Texas Secretary of State David Whitley today encouraged all eligible Texas voters to take advantage of the early voting period ahead of the May 4th election, which begins on Monday, April 22nd and ends on Tuesday, April 30th. "
Continue reading
  639 Hits
  0 Comments
639 Hits
0 Comments

Secretary Whitley Meets With U.S. Census Bureau To Discuss Achieving Complete Count For Texas In 2020 Census

"Texas Secretary of State David Whitley this week met with regional and local representatives from the U.S. Census Bureau to discuss achieving a complete count for the State of Texas in the 2020 Census."
Continue reading
  446 Hits
  0 Comments
446 Hits
0 Comments

Twitter Feed

Law Links

State Bar of Texas The State Bar of Texas serves its members and the public.
Texas Bar Today Texas Bar Today is an online media network featuring curated news and commentary from Texas legal professionals.
Family Law Section The mission of the Family Law Section is to promote the highest degree of professionalism, education, fellowship, and excellence in the practice of family law.
Business Law Section The Business Law Section of the State Bar of Texas covers the complex and expanding fields of corporate, securities, commercial, banking and bankruptcy law.
REPTL Real Estate, Probate and Trust Law, Section of the State Bar of Texas

-Free consultation-